Tribeca 2018 Review: Earthrise

Movies & Entertainment Reviews
"Tribeca 2018 Review: Earthrise"
The original “Earthrise” image, 1968. Photo credit: Bill Anders/NASA.

They should have sent poets because I don’t believe we captured the grandeur of what we had seen.

Back in 1968, Apollo 8 set out to leave earth. In its rear view the first image of earth from space was captured.

Scattered with Apollo 8 home movies and interviews with the men who flew the mission this is one of those short films that will creep its way into schools where students will learn about Apollo 8.

I have to admit that I love films like this. I love space movies, with or without aliens, but I’m also a conspiracy theorist to a certain extent. The film cater to both of my sides even though there is no aspect of this film that makes you believe that the flight never happened.

Jim Lovell prepares for his interview for the film Earthrise, directed by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee. Photo credit: Go Project Films.

The angle taken by this film, to me, puts you on an emotional plane with the astronauts. They take the direction of their emotions surrounding their flight. The astronauts philosophical side emerged as they realize how small we are all within the the vast universe.

The iconic blue marble we are all on is a part of us. Everything we hold dear and love is here. So let’s treat each other better.

Bill Anders in the film Earthrise, directed by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee. Photo credit: Go Project Films.

Only 24 astronauts have experienced the first view that Apollo 8 experienced.  Contemplate on that!